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The City of Raleigh will settle a lawsuit this week alleging discrimination against a Black Division chief
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                    [title] => The City of Raleigh will settle a lawsuit this week alleging discrimination against a Black Division chief
                    [link] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/the-city-of-raleigh-will-settle-a-lawsuit-this-week-alleging-discrimination-against-a-black-division-chief/
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                            [creator] => Bill Moran
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                    [pubdate] => Wed, 23 Jun 2021 10:52:32 +0000
                    [category] => Raleigh
                    [guid] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8844
                    [description] => 
The City of Raleigh will settle a lawsuit this week alleging discrimination against a Black Division chief

The city of Raleigh hired its first black firefighter in 1963. He served three years before stepping down. The second black firefighter, Welton Jones, rose to lieutenant before retiring in 1988. Kevin Coppage was only the third African American to ever be promoted to division chief in Raleigh. He resigned last week. A lawsuit he […]

The post The City of Raleigh will settle a lawsuit this week alleging discrimination against a Black Division chief first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[content] => Array ( [encoded] =>
The City of Raleigh will settle a lawsuit this week alleging discrimination against a Black Division chief

The city of Raleigh hired its first black firefighter in 1963. He served three years before stepping down. The second black firefighter, Welton Jones, rose to lieutenant before retiring in 1988.

Kevin Coppage was only the third African American to ever be promoted to division chief in Raleigh. He resigned last week. A lawsuit he filed against the city in 2020 alleging he was denied promotions based on his race should be settled this week.

Raleigh lagged long behind in recruiting minorities in the fire service. In 2019, only 15 percent of Raleigh’s firefighters were black, even though the city is 30 percent African American.

The lack of diversity was nothing new. In 2007, Jones spoke to the city council, concerned about the ongoing delay in hiring black recruits.

“They kept hiring whites,” Jones said, according to a WRAL article at the time. “Then when I complained about it, every now and then they would put a black in it.”

The department discontinued Coppage in 1994. He had returned from the Marine Corps, where he had served in the Gulf War. He rose steadily in the ranks. In 2009 he was named “Firefighter of the Year” by the American Legion Post 1. Coppage was promoted to captain and then head of division to be only the third African American to be promoted to that level.

But for every promotion Coppage received, there were many that he felt overlooked in favor of less qualified white candidates, the lawsuit said. In 2012, Coppage applied to be the training academy coordinator, but the job went to Brad Harvey, a firefighter whom Coppage actually trained personally. Coppage was denied another promotion that year, and jobs continued to go to less experienced white workers in 2015 and 2017 before being promoted to department head in 2017.

Despite his excellent career, Coppage suffered from PTSD from his Marine Corps service which made him drink. On March 4, 2019, Coppage was charged with drinking under the influence of driving. He alerted his superiors, who initially acted supportive. But the support quickly turned sour, says Coppage.

“I was embarrassed. I was at the lowest point in my life,” Coppage told INDY. “It seemed like every day I went to work I was in one of the boss’s offices, either the boss or my boss . I really had the feeling that the microscope has worked in. “

Less than three weeks later, the department released a number of new guidelines, including a new rule to refuse promotion to employees who have been charged and convicted of DUIs. While the other published guidelines were dated March 21st, the DUI guideline was retrospectively dated March 1st.

“[The department] backdated to address me specifically, ?says Coppage.

Coppage applied for assistant chief later that year but was turned down on his DUI conviction. The white man who was hired “had less relevant educational experience, less relevant credentials and less work experience” than Coppage. A month later, Coppage applied to head the service and lost the job again to a less qualified white candidate, the lawsuit said.

In December 2019, Coppage filed two complaints with the city citing racial discrimination as a reason for losing promotions and alleging that the retrospective DUI policy was harassment and discrimination.

Four months later, in March last year, Coppage filed the lawsuit alleging that racial discrimination had created a hostile work environment that violated civil rights law. Since then, Coppage has been on leave from the department in the “administrative service”.

The city declined to comment on the lawsuit when it was reached by INDY last week.

Coppage’s story, while troubling, is not unique. Nationwide, fire brigades are lagging behind in recruiting non-white candidates, the subject of numerous comments. In 2018, Addington Stewart, president of the International Association of Black Professional Firefighters, penned a commentary for the New York Times addressing systemic bigotry in the industry.

“I served as a firefighter for 35 years and the racism today is as bad as I can remember,” wrote Stewart.

Just last year, North White Plains Fire Chief Andrew Seicol wrote his own editorial in which he spoke out against negative reactions to the Black Lives Matter movement.

“We need to recognize the existence of systemic racism and the numerous forms it takes in society and particularly in the fire service,” wrote Seicol. “We have to admit that it exists in our home.”

Raleigh is apparently unwilling to clean the house, but hopes to calmly settle the lawsuit.

Since the complaint was filed, Coppage has received a number of threatening and harassing text messages from anonymous numbers that INDY has viewed.

In February, a year after he filed his lawsuit, Coppage received a text message warning: ?If you try to come back, I have about 5 complaints that land on the Human Resources desk on the first day. Would strongly advise against it. ”

In April he received another with a link to the lawsuit.

?You were a department head. Race didn’t hold you back. You’re on crack, “was the text. ?The harassment of men and women in the department held you back and fired you. Idiot.”

That lawsuit will be settled this week, according to Coppage’s attorney Joe Budd. Coppage agreed to voluntarily lay off “according to an agreement reached between the parties,” Budd said.

Coppage filed his resignation on June 18, the day after INDY emailed the city asking for comment on the then-active lawsuit.

Budd was silent about the terms of the agreement, but said the settlement did not undermine the basis for the lawsuit.

“Kevin stands by his story,” Budd told INDY. “None of this is a retraction in any way.”

Follow Senior Staff Writer Leigh Tauss on Twitter or email ltauss@indyweek.com.

Support independent local journalism. Join the INDY Press Club to help us keep fearless Guardian coverage and critical arts and culture coverage in the triangle workable.

The post The City of Raleigh will settle a lawsuit this week alleging discrimination against a Black Division chief first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

) [summary] =>
The City of Raleigh will settle a lawsuit this week alleging discrimination against a Black Division chief

The city of Raleigh hired its first black firefighter in 1963. He served three years before stepping down. The second black firefighter, Welton Jones, rose to lieutenant before retiring in 1988. Kevin Coppage was only the third African American to ever be promoted to division chief in Raleigh. He resigned last week. A lawsuit he […]

The post The City of Raleigh will settle a lawsuit this week alleging discrimination against a Black Division chief first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[atom_content] =>
The City of Raleigh will settle a lawsuit this week alleging discrimination against a Black Division chief

The city of Raleigh hired its first black firefighter in 1963. He served three years before stepping down. The second black firefighter, Welton Jones, rose to lieutenant before retiring in 1988.

Kevin Coppage was only the third African American to ever be promoted to division chief in Raleigh. He resigned last week. A lawsuit he filed against the city in 2020 alleging he was denied promotions based on his race should be settled this week.

Raleigh lagged long behind in recruiting minorities in the fire service. In 2019, only 15 percent of Raleigh’s firefighters were black, even though the city is 30 percent African American.

The lack of diversity was nothing new. In 2007, Jones spoke to the city council, concerned about the ongoing delay in hiring black recruits.

“They kept hiring whites,” Jones said, according to a WRAL article at the time. “Then when I complained about it, every now and then they would put a black in it.”

The department discontinued Coppage in 1994. He had returned from the Marine Corps, where he had served in the Gulf War. He rose steadily in the ranks. In 2009 he was named “Firefighter of the Year” by the American Legion Post 1. Coppage was promoted to captain and then head of division to be only the third African American to be promoted to that level.

But for every promotion Coppage received, there were many that he felt overlooked in favor of less qualified white candidates, the lawsuit said. In 2012, Coppage applied to be the training academy coordinator, but the job went to Brad Harvey, a firefighter whom Coppage actually trained personally. Coppage was denied another promotion that year, and jobs continued to go to less experienced white workers in 2015 and 2017 before being promoted to department head in 2017.

Despite his excellent career, Coppage suffered from PTSD from his Marine Corps service which made him drink. On March 4, 2019, Coppage was charged with drinking under the influence of driving. He alerted his superiors, who initially acted supportive. But the support quickly turned sour, says Coppage.

“I was embarrassed. I was at the lowest point in my life,” Coppage told INDY. “It seemed like every day I went to work I was in one of the boss’s offices, either the boss or my boss . I really had the feeling that the microscope has worked in. “

Less than three weeks later, the department released a number of new guidelines, including a new rule to refuse promotion to employees who have been charged and convicted of DUIs. While the other published guidelines were dated March 21st, the DUI guideline was retrospectively dated March 1st.

“[The department] backdated to address me specifically, ?says Coppage.

Coppage applied for assistant chief later that year but was turned down on his DUI conviction. The white man who was hired “had less relevant educational experience, less relevant credentials and less work experience” than Coppage. A month later, Coppage applied to head the service and lost the job again to a less qualified white candidate, the lawsuit said.

In December 2019, Coppage filed two complaints with the city citing racial discrimination as a reason for losing promotions and alleging that the retrospective DUI policy was harassment and discrimination.

Four months later, in March last year, Coppage filed the lawsuit alleging that racial discrimination had created a hostile work environment that violated civil rights law. Since then, Coppage has been on leave from the department in the “administrative service”.

The city declined to comment on the lawsuit when it was reached by INDY last week.

Coppage’s story, while troubling, is not unique. Nationwide, fire brigades are lagging behind in recruiting non-white candidates, the subject of numerous comments. In 2018, Addington Stewart, president of the International Association of Black Professional Firefighters, penned a commentary for the New York Times addressing systemic bigotry in the industry.

“I served as a firefighter for 35 years and the racism today is as bad as I can remember,” wrote Stewart.

Just last year, North White Plains Fire Chief Andrew Seicol wrote his own editorial in which he spoke out against negative reactions to the Black Lives Matter movement.

“We need to recognize the existence of systemic racism and the numerous forms it takes in society and particularly in the fire service,” wrote Seicol. “We have to admit that it exists in our home.”

Raleigh is apparently unwilling to clean the house, but hopes to calmly settle the lawsuit.

Since the complaint was filed, Coppage has received a number of threatening and harassing text messages from anonymous numbers that INDY has viewed.

In February, a year after he filed his lawsuit, Coppage received a text message warning: ?If you try to come back, I have about 5 complaints that land on the Human Resources desk on the first day. Would strongly advise against it. ”

In April he received another with a link to the lawsuit.

?You were a department head. Race didn’t hold you back. You’re on crack, “was the text. ?The harassment of men and women in the department held you back and fired you. Idiot.”

That lawsuit will be settled this week, according to Coppage’s attorney Joe Budd. Coppage agreed to voluntarily lay off “according to an agreement reached between the parties,” Budd said.

Coppage filed his resignation on June 18, the day after INDY emailed the city asking for comment on the then-active lawsuit.

Budd was silent about the terms of the agreement, but said the settlement did not undermine the basis for the lawsuit.

“Kevin stands by his story,” Budd told INDY. “None of this is a retraction in any way.”

Follow Senior Staff Writer Leigh Tauss on Twitter or email ltauss@indyweek.com.

Support independent local journalism. Join the INDY Press Club to help us keep fearless Guardian coverage and critical arts and culture coverage in the triangle workable.

The post The City of Raleigh will settle a lawsuit this week alleging discrimination against a Black Division chief first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[date_timestamp] => 1624445552 ) [1] => Array ( [title] => NC Senate on track to pass budget bill that includes controversial law changes [link] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/nc-senate-on-track-to-pass-budget-bill-that-includes-controversial-law-changes/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Bill Moran ) [pubdate] => Wed, 23 Jun 2021 10:03:49 +0000 [category] => News [guid] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8841 [description] =>
NC Senate on track to pass budget bill that includes controversial law changes

Special provisions target executive branch powers of Democratic officials Budget-writing season started with hopes for cooperation and a financial roadmap that would gain significant bipartisan support. That?s all soured in the early stages of budget debates, however, with Senate Democrats questioning a Republican-written budget that?s pumped full of ?special provisions? that would limit executive branch […]

The post NC Senate on track to pass budget bill that includes controversial law changes first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[content] => Array ( [encoded] =>
NC Senate on track to pass budget bill that includes controversial law changes

Special provisions target executive branch powers of Democratic officials

Budget-writing season started with hopes for cooperation and a financial roadmap that would gain significant bipartisan support.

That?s all soured in the early stages of budget debates, however, with Senate Democrats questioning a Republican-written budget that?s pumped full of ?special provisions? that would limit executive branch powers.

On Tuesday, Sen. Jay Chaudhuri, a Wake County Democrat, asked about several provisions. One would limit the governor?s powers to declare a state of emergency lasting more than 10 days. Another would prevent the state attorney general from agreeing to legal settlements without approval from legislative leaders ? if those lawmakers are named parties. And other language removes the State Board of Elections? power to agree to court settlements when the legislature is not in session.

Republicans objected to Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper?s decisions in the COVID-19 pandemic that limited and closed businesses. They passed bills last year in an attempt to reopen bars, bowling alleys, and other businesses, but were not able to overcome Cooper?s vetoes.

Republicans are also angry about a lawsuit that Attorney General Josh Stein, a Democrat, and the State Board of Elections settled last fall, which allowed the deadline for receipt of mail-in absentee ballots to be extended to nine days after Election Day; it had previously been just three. The House and Senate have also passed bills this session seeking these limits on the attorney general and the elections board.

Another provision would prevent the attorney general from joining out-of-state or federal lawsuits that don?t involve recovering damages for the state, unless the Council of State approves.

The Council of State is composed of officials elected statewide to executive offices. Most of its members are Republican.

Attorney General Josh Stein

Stein has joined a number of lawsuits over the years, some challenging former President Donald Trump and his appointees. Last year he joined a suit against the U.S Postal Service and Postmaster General Louis DeJoy over changes that delayed mail delivery. DeJoy has long resided in Greensboro and has been a major Republican fundraiser.

Stein also joined lawsuits challenging the Trump administration over changes to the Endangered Species Act, as well as Trump?s attempt to end DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

?This bill appears to be less of a budget document and more of a power grab against the governor, the attorney general, and the State Board of Elections,? Chaudhuri said during Tuesday?s budget committee discussion.

Republican senators said provisions like these have always been in budgets.

Sen. Gladys Robinson, a Guilford County Democrat, said Democrats believed the development of a state budget this year would be ?a collaborative process,? but as that collaboration stopped in the final stages.

?It would have been easier if you had been more inclusive of us,? Robinson said. ?That was our intent.?

Sen. Kathy Harrington, a Gaston County Republican and budget committee co-chairwoman, said she and other party members had worked with individual Democratic senators all along.

The Senate budget committee approved the spending proposal and sent it to the Senate Finance Committee, which will debate it today.

After the Senate approves its proposal, the budget action moves to the state House. The House will write and pass its own version. Typically, the two chambers end up negotiating a compromise that goes to the governor.

The Senate?s $25.7 billion budget proposal includes 3% raises for teachers, state employees, community college and UNC employees over two years.

Teachers have not had a raise in two years because of a budget stalemate between Cooper and the legislature. The NC Association of Educators was quick to denounce the slight increase.

The Senate budget proposal also includes bonuses for teachers and other state employees.

The budget adds $61.8 million for private school vouchers, bringing the total available for next year to $146.6 million.

The budget creates a new line item for school psychologists. Through transfers from an existing line item and some additional money, there would be enough for the state pay for one school psychologist for each school district, said Sen. Ralph Hise, a Spruce Pine Republican and budget committee co-chairman.

Sen. Gladys Robinson (D-Guilford)

A new salary schedule for state corrections officers would result in an average 7% salary increase for them.

The Senate proposal would also cut the personal income tax more deeply than other reductions the Senate has already approved. The standard deduction ? the amount earned before taxes are collected ? would increase. For married couples filing jointly, the standard deduction would rise to $25,500 from $21,500.

The personal income tax rate would gradually decrease, from the current 5.25% to 3.99% after 2025.

Medicaid expansion, or some version of it, which Cooper and Senate Democrats had been pushing for, is not in the budget.Cooper said weeks ago he knew it would not be included.

The budget does have a provision allowing women who are covered by Medicaid while they?re pregnant to continue using the government insurance program for a year after they give birth. Currently, pregnancy Medicaid, as it?s called, cuts off two months postpartum. As a result, some women using Medicaid missed postpartum check-ups. The short time limit is seen as contributing to maternal illness and death.

Medicaid covers about half of the state?s births. Securing the 10-month extension was a priority for doctors and other health professionals.

Sen. Jay Chaudhuri (D-Wake)

The budget proposal includes $125 million for repairs and renovations to UNC buildings, and money for new construction on UNC campuses. The proposal dedicates $21.5 million for a new Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University in Greenville, and $18.25 million for a UNC-NC State STEM building.

Robinson said state budgets regularly shortchange Historically Black Colleges and Universities..

?To me, it looks like if you give the HBCUs a little, you have to give the non-HBCUs a whole lot more to compensate,? she said during a break in the meeting. ?That?s what continues to go on, so no, I?m not pleased.?

The budget passed out of committee on a voice vote with a smattering of ?noes.?

?On the spending side, the budget shortchanges our teachers and fails to make needed investments in public education,? Chaudhari said in an interview after the meeting. ?It shortchanges working families. It fails to make investments needed in childcare.?

Chaudhuri said Senate leader Phil Berger made it clear in his news conference Monday that the budget was designed with an eye toward negotiations with the House and the Governor. ?That means it has to be a bare-bones budget,? Chaudhuri said, ?Which it is.?



originally published at http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ncpolicywatch.com%2F2021%2F06%2F23%2Fnc-senate-on-track-to-pass-budget-bill-that-includes-controversial-law-changes%2F by Lynn Bonner

The post NC Senate on track to pass budget bill that includes controversial law changes first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

) [summary] =>
NC Senate on track to pass budget bill that includes controversial law changes

Special provisions target executive branch powers of Democratic officials Budget-writing season started with hopes for cooperation and a financial roadmap that would gain significant bipartisan support. That?s all soured in the early stages of budget debates, however, with Senate Democrats questioning a Republican-written budget that?s pumped full of ?special provisions? that would limit executive branch […]

The post NC Senate on track to pass budget bill that includes controversial law changes first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[atom_content] =>
NC Senate on track to pass budget bill that includes controversial law changes

Special provisions target executive branch powers of Democratic officials

Budget-writing season started with hopes for cooperation and a financial roadmap that would gain significant bipartisan support.

That?s all soured in the early stages of budget debates, however, with Senate Democrats questioning a Republican-written budget that?s pumped full of ?special provisions? that would limit executive branch powers.

On Tuesday, Sen. Jay Chaudhuri, a Wake County Democrat, asked about several provisions. One would limit the governor?s powers to declare a state of emergency lasting more than 10 days. Another would prevent the state attorney general from agreeing to legal settlements without approval from legislative leaders ? if those lawmakers are named parties. And other language removes the State Board of Elections? power to agree to court settlements when the legislature is not in session.

Republicans objected to Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper?s decisions in the COVID-19 pandemic that limited and closed businesses. They passed bills last year in an attempt to reopen bars, bowling alleys, and other businesses, but were not able to overcome Cooper?s vetoes.

Republicans are also angry about a lawsuit that Attorney General Josh Stein, a Democrat, and the State Board of Elections settled last fall, which allowed the deadline for receipt of mail-in absentee ballots to be extended to nine days after Election Day; it had previously been just three. The House and Senate have also passed bills this session seeking these limits on the attorney general and the elections board.

Another provision would prevent the attorney general from joining out-of-state or federal lawsuits that don?t involve recovering damages for the state, unless the Council of State approves.

The Council of State is composed of officials elected statewide to executive offices. Most of its members are Republican.

Attorney General Josh Stein

Stein has joined a number of lawsuits over the years, some challenging former President Donald Trump and his appointees. Last year he joined a suit against the U.S Postal Service and Postmaster General Louis DeJoy over changes that delayed mail delivery. DeJoy has long resided in Greensboro and has been a major Republican fundraiser.

Stein also joined lawsuits challenging the Trump administration over changes to the Endangered Species Act, as well as Trump?s attempt to end DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

?This bill appears to be less of a budget document and more of a power grab against the governor, the attorney general, and the State Board of Elections,? Chaudhuri said during Tuesday?s budget committee discussion.

Republican senators said provisions like these have always been in budgets.

Sen. Gladys Robinson, a Guilford County Democrat, said Democrats believed the development of a state budget this year would be ?a collaborative process,? but as that collaboration stopped in the final stages.

?It would have been easier if you had been more inclusive of us,? Robinson said. ?That was our intent.?

Sen. Kathy Harrington, a Gaston County Republican and budget committee co-chairwoman, said she and other party members had worked with individual Democratic senators all along.

The Senate budget committee approved the spending proposal and sent it to the Senate Finance Committee, which will debate it today.

After the Senate approves its proposal, the budget action moves to the state House. The House will write and pass its own version. Typically, the two chambers end up negotiating a compromise that goes to the governor.

The Senate?s $25.7 billion budget proposal includes 3% raises for teachers, state employees, community college and UNC employees over two years.

Teachers have not had a raise in two years because of a budget stalemate between Cooper and the legislature. The NC Association of Educators was quick to denounce the slight increase.

The Senate budget proposal also includes bonuses for teachers and other state employees.

The budget adds $61.8 million for private school vouchers, bringing the total available for next year to $146.6 million.

The budget creates a new line item for school psychologists. Through transfers from an existing line item and some additional money, there would be enough for the state pay for one school psychologist for each school district, said Sen. Ralph Hise, a Spruce Pine Republican and budget committee co-chairman.

Sen. Gladys Robinson (D-Guilford)

A new salary schedule for state corrections officers would result in an average 7% salary increase for them.

The Senate proposal would also cut the personal income tax more deeply than other reductions the Senate has already approved. The standard deduction ? the amount earned before taxes are collected ? would increase. For married couples filing jointly, the standard deduction would rise to $25,500 from $21,500.

The personal income tax rate would gradually decrease, from the current 5.25% to 3.99% after 2025.

Medicaid expansion, or some version of it, which Cooper and Senate Democrats had been pushing for, is not in the budget.Cooper said weeks ago he knew it would not be included.

The budget does have a provision allowing women who are covered by Medicaid while they?re pregnant to continue using the government insurance program for a year after they give birth. Currently, pregnancy Medicaid, as it?s called, cuts off two months postpartum. As a result, some women using Medicaid missed postpartum check-ups. The short time limit is seen as contributing to maternal illness and death.

Medicaid covers about half of the state?s births. Securing the 10-month extension was a priority for doctors and other health professionals.

Sen. Jay Chaudhuri (D-Wake)

The budget proposal includes $125 million for repairs and renovations to UNC buildings, and money for new construction on UNC campuses. The proposal dedicates $21.5 million for a new Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University in Greenville, and $18.25 million for a UNC-NC State STEM building.

Robinson said state budgets regularly shortchange Historically Black Colleges and Universities..

?To me, it looks like if you give the HBCUs a little, you have to give the non-HBCUs a whole lot more to compensate,? she said during a break in the meeting. ?That?s what continues to go on, so no, I?m not pleased.?

The budget passed out of committee on a voice vote with a smattering of ?noes.?

?On the spending side, the budget shortchanges our teachers and fails to make needed investments in public education,? Chaudhari said in an interview after the meeting. ?It shortchanges working families. It fails to make investments needed in childcare.?

Chaudhuri said Senate leader Phil Berger made it clear in his news conference Monday that the budget was designed with an eye toward negotiations with the House and the Governor. ?That means it has to be a bare-bones budget,? Chaudhuri said, ?Which it is.?



originally published at http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ncpolicywatch.com%2F2021%2F06%2F23%2Fnc-senate-on-track-to-pass-budget-bill-that-includes-controversial-law-changes%2F by Lynn Bonner

The post NC Senate on track to pass budget bill that includes controversial law changes first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[date_timestamp] => 1624442629 ) [2] => Array ( [title] => 2040 plan could redesign Charlotte: ?Nice, what they are building, but ?? [link] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/2040-plan-could-redesign-charlotte-nice-what-they-are-building-but/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Bill Moran ) [pubdate] => Wed, 23 Jun 2021 09:23:45 +0000 [category] => Charlotte [guid] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8838 [description] =>
2040 plan could redesign Charlotte: "Nice, what they are building, but ..."

CHARLOTTE, NC (FOX 46 CHARLOTTE) – Neighborhoods could change across Charlotte soon after city guides approved a new plan that allows apartments and maisonettes to be built in neighborhoods that traditionally only allow single-family homes. Her garden is her pride and joy, even if Nilda Navdo did not manage everything. “I didn’t mow my lawn […]

The post 2040 plan could redesign Charlotte: "Nice, what they are building, but ..." first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[content] => Array ( [encoded] =>
2040 plan could redesign Charlotte: "Nice, what they are building, but ..."

CHARLOTTE, NC (FOX 46 CHARLOTTE) – Neighborhoods could change across Charlotte soon after city guides approved a new plan that allows apartments and maisonettes to be built in neighborhoods that traditionally only allow single-family homes.

Her garden is her pride and joy, even if Nilda Navdo did not manage everything.

“I didn’t mow my lawn before you came, but I’m proud of my grass,” laughed Nilda.

She has lived in her east Charlotte home for more than 20 years and now worries that the next 20 will look very different.

“That’s where we see the change,” said Nilda. “It’s nice what you build, but …”

Just a few streets away, new houses are being built for around $ 400,000 each. That is far more than they or their neighbors bought their homes.

Where to celebrate July 4th, check out the fireworks in the Charlotte area

?The solution to affordable housing is not to disturb the neighborhood like here,? said Nilda.

Charlotte has grown so much over the past 30 years and city guides try to keep up. They approved a new plan on Monday, the 2040 plan, which allows apartments and semi-detached houses to be built in areas that are not normally used for them.

“We’re going to make sure everyone in this community has the opportunity to have a safe place to live, a good job, and the quality of life we ??all want, and this plan is helping us do that,” Mayor Vi Lyles said Monday .

Nilda says she understands that there has to be affordable housing, so she’s in her neighborhood. She’s just worried that it might be priced out soon.

We scream, we don’t need this. It doesn’t matter, the vote is accepted because this community is unfortunately not heard. “

The post 2040 plan could redesign Charlotte: "Nice, what they are building, but ..." first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

) [summary] =>
2040 plan could redesign Charlotte: "Nice, what they are building, but ..."

CHARLOTTE, NC (FOX 46 CHARLOTTE) – Neighborhoods could change across Charlotte soon after city guides approved a new plan that allows apartments and maisonettes to be built in neighborhoods that traditionally only allow single-family homes. Her garden is her pride and joy, even if Nilda Navdo did not manage everything. “I didn’t mow my lawn […]

The post 2040 plan could redesign Charlotte: "Nice, what they are building, but ..." first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[atom_content] =>
2040 plan could redesign Charlotte: "Nice, what they are building, but ..."

CHARLOTTE, NC (FOX 46 CHARLOTTE) – Neighborhoods could change across Charlotte soon after city guides approved a new plan that allows apartments and maisonettes to be built in neighborhoods that traditionally only allow single-family homes.

Her garden is her pride and joy, even if Nilda Navdo did not manage everything.

“I didn’t mow my lawn before you came, but I’m proud of my grass,” laughed Nilda.

She has lived in her east Charlotte home for more than 20 years and now worries that the next 20 will look very different.

“That’s where we see the change,” said Nilda. “It’s nice what you build, but …”

Just a few streets away, new houses are being built for around $ 400,000 each. That is far more than they or their neighbors bought their homes.

Where to celebrate July 4th, check out the fireworks in the Charlotte area

?The solution to affordable housing is not to disturb the neighborhood like here,? said Nilda.

Charlotte has grown so much over the past 30 years and city guides try to keep up. They approved a new plan on Monday, the 2040 plan, which allows apartments and semi-detached houses to be built in areas that are not normally used for them.

“We’re going to make sure everyone in this community has the opportunity to have a safe place to live, a good job, and the quality of life we ??all want, and this plan is helping us do that,” Mayor Vi Lyles said Monday .

Nilda says she understands that there has to be affordable housing, so she’s in her neighborhood. She’s just worried that it might be priced out soon.

We scream, we don’t need this. It doesn’t matter, the vote is accepted because this community is unfortunately not heard. “

The post 2040 plan could redesign Charlotte: "Nice, what they are building, but ..." first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[date_timestamp] => 1624440225 ) [3] => Array ( [title] => Does Greensboro make the grade for healthy air high quality? | Columnists [link] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/does-greensboro-make-the-grade-for-healthy-air-high-quality-columnists/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Bill Moran ) [pubdate] => Wed, 23 Jun 2021 06:57:28 +0000 [category] => Greensboro [guid] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8834 [description] =>
Does Greensboro make the grade for healthy air quality?  |  Columnists

The American Lung Association recently released the 2021 State of the Air Report, which is the organization’s annual national Air Quality Report. The report tracks ground-level ozone air pollution (also known as smog), annual particulate pollution (also known as soot), and short-term spikes in particulate pollution. The ?State of the Air? report 2021 examines the […]

The post Does Greensboro make the grade for healthy air high quality? | Columnists first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[content] => Array ( [encoded] =>
Does Greensboro make the grade for healthy air quality?  |  Columnists

The American Lung Association recently released the 2021 State of the Air Report, which is the organization’s annual national Air Quality Report. The report tracks ground-level ozone air pollution (also known as smog), annual particulate pollution (also known as soot), and short-term spikes in particulate pollution. The ?State of the Air? report 2021 examines the air quality in 2017, 2018 and 2019.

Here in Greensboro, air quality was rated ?B? for ozone, ?A? for 24-hour particulate pollution, and did well for annual particulate pollution. (See our full report at Lung.org/SOTA.)

Ozone and particulate pollution are two of the most widespread and dangerous air pollutants. Inhaling these pollutants can cause asthma attacks, respiratory and cardiovascular damage, and even early death. Particulate air pollution can also cause lung cancer. Ozone irritates and damages your airways and lungs. It causes asthma and emphysema attacks, and increases people’s risk of death. It can also cause asthma and cause emphysema to progress. Even two days of unhealthy exposure to ozone can be harmful to health.

Despite advances in air pollution eradication, more than 4 in 10 people in the United States still live in counties with unhealthy ozone or particulate pollution. The ?State of the Air? report also shows that people of color inhale polluted air significantly more frequently than whites.

The post Does Greensboro make the grade for healthy air high quality? | Columnists first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

) [summary] =>
Does Greensboro make the grade for healthy air quality?  |  Columnists

The American Lung Association recently released the 2021 State of the Air Report, which is the organization’s annual national Air Quality Report. The report tracks ground-level ozone air pollution (also known as smog), annual particulate pollution (also known as soot), and short-term spikes in particulate pollution. The ?State of the Air? report 2021 examines the […]

The post Does Greensboro make the grade for healthy air high quality? | Columnists first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[atom_content] =>
Does Greensboro make the grade for healthy air quality?  |  Columnists

The American Lung Association recently released the 2021 State of the Air Report, which is the organization’s annual national Air Quality Report. The report tracks ground-level ozone air pollution (also known as smog), annual particulate pollution (also known as soot), and short-term spikes in particulate pollution. The ?State of the Air? report 2021 examines the air quality in 2017, 2018 and 2019.

Here in Greensboro, air quality was rated ?B? for ozone, ?A? for 24-hour particulate pollution, and did well for annual particulate pollution. (See our full report at Lung.org/SOTA.)

Ozone and particulate pollution are two of the most widespread and dangerous air pollutants. Inhaling these pollutants can cause asthma attacks, respiratory and cardiovascular damage, and even early death. Particulate air pollution can also cause lung cancer. Ozone irritates and damages your airways and lungs. It causes asthma and emphysema attacks, and increases people’s risk of death. It can also cause asthma and cause emphysema to progress. Even two days of unhealthy exposure to ozone can be harmful to health.

Despite advances in air pollution eradication, more than 4 in 10 people in the United States still live in counties with unhealthy ozone or particulate pollution. The ?State of the Air? report also shows that people of color inhale polluted air significantly more frequently than whites.

The post Does Greensboro make the grade for healthy air high quality? | Columnists first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[date_timestamp] => 1624431448 ) [4] => Array ( [title] => Documents reveal new details on Apple?s deal for the RTP campus [link] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/documents-reveal-new-details-on-apples-deal-for-the-rtp-campus/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Bill Moran ) [pubdate] => Wed, 23 Jun 2021 04:41:41 +0000 [category] => Durham [guid] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8831 [description] =>
Documents reveal new details on Apple's deal for the RTP campus

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC (WTVD) – Newly released documents provide new insights into Apple’s move to the Triangle. Commerce Department records show that the state’s Economic Investment Committee approved a $ 845 million grant tied to new jobs created for the proposed project by the end of 2032. Apple would have to create at least […]

The post Documents reveal new details on Apple's deal for the RTP campus first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[content] => Array ( [encoded] =>
Documents reveal new details on Apple's deal for the RTP campus

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC (WTVD) – Newly released documents provide new insights into Apple’s move to the Triangle.

Commerce Department records show that the state’s Economic Investment Committee approved a $ 845 million grant tied to new jobs created for the proposed project by the end of 2032.

Apple would have to create at least 2,700 jobs by then to avoid late payments.

READ MORE: Wake County executives discuss Apple’s role in RTP

The jobs would be created between 2023 and 2032.

Jobs must be at least $ 133,000 per year for the first three years and $ 168,000 each year thereafter.

WATCH: Heads of State Explain Why Apple’s Investment Is Such a Big Deal

Apple plans to invest $ 1 billion to build a campus and development center in Research Triangle Park.

The campus would house at least 3,000 employees.

WATCH: NC State Economist on Apple’s Big Impact in NC

Copyright 2021 WTVD-TV. All rights reserved.

The post Documents reveal new details on Apple's deal for the RTP campus first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

) [summary] =>
Documents reveal new details on Apple's deal for the RTP campus

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC (WTVD) – Newly released documents provide new insights into Apple’s move to the Triangle. Commerce Department records show that the state’s Economic Investment Committee approved a $ 845 million grant tied to new jobs created for the proposed project by the end of 2032. Apple would have to create at least […]

The post Documents reveal new details on Apple's deal for the RTP campus first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[atom_content] =>
Documents reveal new details on Apple's deal for the RTP campus

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NC (WTVD) – Newly released documents provide new insights into Apple’s move to the Triangle.

Commerce Department records show that the state’s Economic Investment Committee approved a $ 845 million grant tied to new jobs created for the proposed project by the end of 2032.

Apple would have to create at least 2,700 jobs by then to avoid late payments.

READ MORE: Wake County executives discuss Apple’s role in RTP

The jobs would be created between 2023 and 2032.

Jobs must be at least $ 133,000 per year for the first three years and $ 168,000 each year thereafter.

WATCH: Heads of State Explain Why Apple’s Investment Is Such a Big Deal

Apple plans to invest $ 1 billion to build a campus and development center in Research Triangle Park.

The campus would house at least 3,000 employees.

WATCH: NC State Economist on Apple’s Big Impact in NC

Copyright 2021 WTVD-TV. All rights reserved.

The post Documents reveal new details on Apple's deal for the RTP campus first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[date_timestamp] => 1624423301 ) [5] => Array ( [title] => Man shot in drive-by shooting in southeast Raleigh, police say [link] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/man-shot-in-drive-by-shooting-in-southeast-raleigh-police-say/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Bill Moran ) [pubdate] => Wed, 23 Jun 2021 03:51:40 +0000 [category] => Raleigh [guid] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8828 [description] =>
Man shot in drive-by shooting in southeast Raleigh, police say

RALEIGH, NC (WNCN) – A person was shot in a drive-by shootout outside a house in a southeast neighborhood of Raleigh Tuesday night, police said. The incident was reported to Raleigh Police at around 10:30 p.m. in Block 3700 on Argonne Way. According to the police, witnesses are said to have fired shots from the […]

The post Man shot in drive-by shooting in southeast Raleigh, police say first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[content] => Array ( [encoded] =>
Man shot in drive-by shooting in southeast Raleigh, police say

RALEIGH, NC (WNCN) – A person was shot in a drive-by shootout outside a house in a southeast neighborhood of Raleigh Tuesday night, police said.

The incident was reported to Raleigh Police at around 10:30 p.m. in Block 3700 on Argonne Way.

According to the police, witnesses are said to have fired shots from the passenger side of a black Nissan Altima.

The victim, a man in his mid-twenties, was hit in the lower leg near the shin. He was taken to a nearby hospital for treatment.

The area where the shooting took place is in a neighborhood north of Battle Bridge Road near the River Neuse.

Further details were not known.

The post Man shot in drive-by shooting in southeast Raleigh, police say first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

) [summary] =>
Man shot in drive-by shooting in southeast Raleigh, police say

RALEIGH, NC (WNCN) – A person was shot in a drive-by shootout outside a house in a southeast neighborhood of Raleigh Tuesday night, police said. The incident was reported to Raleigh Police at around 10:30 p.m. in Block 3700 on Argonne Way. According to the police, witnesses are said to have fired shots from the […]

The post Man shot in drive-by shooting in southeast Raleigh, police say first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[atom_content] =>
Man shot in drive-by shooting in southeast Raleigh, police say

RALEIGH, NC (WNCN) – A person was shot in a drive-by shootout outside a house in a southeast neighborhood of Raleigh Tuesday night, police said.

The incident was reported to Raleigh Police at around 10:30 p.m. in Block 3700 on Argonne Way.

According to the police, witnesses are said to have fired shots from the passenger side of a black Nissan Altima.

The victim, a man in his mid-twenties, was hit in the lower leg near the shin. He was taken to a nearby hospital for treatment.

The area where the shooting took place is in a neighborhood north of Battle Bridge Road near the River Neuse.

Further details were not known.

The post Man shot in drive-by shooting in southeast Raleigh, police say first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[date_timestamp] => 1624420300 ) [6] => Array ( [title] => Winston Salem activists say the gun violence won?t stop until everyone gets involved [link] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/winston-salem-activists-say-the-gun-violence-wont-stop-until-everyone-gets-involved/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Bill Moran ) [pubdate] => Wed, 23 Jun 2021 03:16:16 +0000 [category] => Winston-Salem [guid] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8825 [description] =>
Winston Salem activists say the gun violence won't stop until everyone gets involved

WINSTON-SALEM, NC (WGHP) – Activists and groups from the Winston-Salem community have joined forces to stress that the gun violence that has ravaged the city can only be resolved if everyone steps in to help. On Tuesday, heads of Hope Dealers Outreach, Mom’s Demand Action and families of gun violence victims held a press conference […]

The post Winston Salem activists say the gun violence won't stop until everyone gets involved first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[content] => Array ( [encoded] =>
Winston Salem activists say the gun violence won't stop until everyone gets involved

WINSTON-SALEM, NC (WGHP) – Activists and groups from the Winston-Salem community have joined forces to stress that the gun violence that has ravaged the city can only be resolved if everyone steps in to help.

On Tuesday, heads of Hope Dealers Outreach, Mom’s Demand Action and families of gun violence victims held a press conference in Winston-Salem.

Winston-Salem has seen 16 gun violence-related homicides as of June 22, compared to 10 in 2020, a year in which 23 people were killed by gun violence.

Frankie Gist, a longtime equality and peace activist with Hope Dealers Outreach, has led protests, community events, and spoken to law enforcement about ways to make positive change over the past several years.

On Tuesday, he said emotionally that he felt none of this worked. ?Every time I turn the food favors over, they don’t work. The protest doesn’t work. Every time I turn around, a different mother calls me and cries. “

Gist spends much of his time ?in the trenches,? as he calls it, caring for children and individuals who live in poverty and are stuck in neighborhoods that experience gun violence on a regular basis.

What is happening today Receive your daily news with the FOX8 newsletter.

When asked why he believed these shootings took place, he stated that it was envy of someone else’s materials or social status.

?Poverty and lack of funding. If I continue to live in a place where everything around me is stuck – my mother is struggling, she is doing her best to make ends meet. Now I have to take to the streets to make money; Now I make money, now there is another person in my neighborhood who is or is on another side of town. I don’t like how much money you have me. Now I have to go to your side of town and take a drive by. I don’t care if your son is out there, I don’t care if you have kids out there. I’m coming out of there to prove to you that I’m jealous. “

To curb this violence, activists and victims of violence have called on the city to create more stable jobs that enable people in poverty to have careers and affordable afternoon programs for children.

?We need free programs that do them justice. The problem is that few of us work. It will take all of us to build, ?said Gists.

Shut down

Suggest a correction

The post Winston Salem activists say the gun violence won't stop until everyone gets involved first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

) [summary] =>
Winston Salem activists say the gun violence won't stop until everyone gets involved

WINSTON-SALEM, NC (WGHP) – Activists and groups from the Winston-Salem community have joined forces to stress that the gun violence that has ravaged the city can only be resolved if everyone steps in to help. On Tuesday, heads of Hope Dealers Outreach, Mom’s Demand Action and families of gun violence victims held a press conference […]

The post Winston Salem activists say the gun violence won't stop until everyone gets involved first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[atom_content] =>
Winston Salem activists say the gun violence won't stop until everyone gets involved

WINSTON-SALEM, NC (WGHP) – Activists and groups from the Winston-Salem community have joined forces to stress that the gun violence that has ravaged the city can only be resolved if everyone steps in to help.

On Tuesday, heads of Hope Dealers Outreach, Mom’s Demand Action and families of gun violence victims held a press conference in Winston-Salem.

Winston-Salem has seen 16 gun violence-related homicides as of June 22, compared to 10 in 2020, a year in which 23 people were killed by gun violence.

Frankie Gist, a longtime equality and peace activist with Hope Dealers Outreach, has led protests, community events, and spoken to law enforcement about ways to make positive change over the past several years.

On Tuesday, he said emotionally that he felt none of this worked. ?Every time I turn the food favors over, they don’t work. The protest doesn’t work. Every time I turn around, a different mother calls me and cries. “

Gist spends much of his time ?in the trenches,? as he calls it, caring for children and individuals who live in poverty and are stuck in neighborhoods that experience gun violence on a regular basis.

What is happening today Receive your daily news with the FOX8 newsletter.

When asked why he believed these shootings took place, he stated that it was envy of someone else’s materials or social status.

?Poverty and lack of funding. If I continue to live in a place where everything around me is stuck – my mother is struggling, she is doing her best to make ends meet. Now I have to take to the streets to make money; Now I make money, now there is another person in my neighborhood who is or is on another side of town. I don’t like how much money you have me. Now I have to go to your side of town and take a drive by. I don’t care if your son is out there, I don’t care if you have kids out there. I’m coming out of there to prove to you that I’m jealous. “

To curb this violence, activists and victims of violence have called on the city to create more stable jobs that enable people in poverty to have careers and affordable afternoon programs for children.

?We need free programs that do them justice. The problem is that few of us work. It will take all of us to build, ?said Gists.

Shut down

Suggest a correction

The post Winston Salem activists say the gun violence won't stop until everyone gets involved first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[date_timestamp] => 1624418176 ) [7] => Array ( [title] => COVID-19 Vaccination Clinics Coming To A Neighborhood Of Greensboro Near You | Local [link] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/covid-19-vaccination-clinics-coming-to-a-neighborhood-of-greensboro-near-you-local/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Bill Moran ) [pubdate] => Wed, 23 Jun 2021 02:56:04 +0000 [category] => Greensboro [guid] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8822 [description] =>
COVID-19 Vaccination Clinics Coming To A Neighborhood Of Greensboro Near You |  Local

GREENSBORO – Local health officials announced they are closing the COVID-19 vaccination clinic at Greensboro Coliseum and focusing on getting the vaccinations right to neighborhoods and some doctor’s offices. The Guilford County’s Department of Health said in a press release that it will no longer offer first-dose COVID-19 vaccinations at the Coliseum on July 9. […]

The post COVID-19 Vaccination Clinics Coming To A Neighborhood Of Greensboro Near You | Local first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[content] => Array ( [encoded] =>
COVID-19 Vaccination Clinics Coming To A Neighborhood Of Greensboro Near You |  Local

GREENSBORO – Local health officials announced they are closing the COVID-19 vaccination clinic at Greensboro Coliseum and focusing on getting the vaccinations right to neighborhoods and some doctor’s offices.

The Guilford County’s Department of Health said in a press release that it will no longer offer first-dose COVID-19 vaccinations at the Coliseum on July 9.

The Guilford County Health Department and Cone Health operate COVID-19 vaccination clinics at Greensboro Coliseum.

Cone Health also said in a news release that mass vaccination sites at Zion Baptist Church in Rockingham County will be closed Thursday and the Burlington Manufacturers’ Outlet Center in Alamance County will close on July 31.

“For the next step in vaccinating our community, we believe it is important to make vaccination even more convenient,” said Debbie Grant, chief nurse officer of Cone Health, in the press release. “This means that we are placing more emphasis on vaccinating people in their neighborhood and at work.”

In its publication, Guilford County said vaccination clinics are held in partnership with churches, schools, recreational facilities, and similar groups. Appointments are possible for people aged 12 and over and can be arranged at www.GuilfordVacciation.com. Viewing appointments are possible, but advance notice is recommended.

The post COVID-19 Vaccination Clinics Coming To A Neighborhood Of Greensboro Near You | Local first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

) [summary] =>
COVID-19 Vaccination Clinics Coming To A Neighborhood Of Greensboro Near You |  Local

GREENSBORO – Local health officials announced they are closing the COVID-19 vaccination clinic at Greensboro Coliseum and focusing on getting the vaccinations right to neighborhoods and some doctor’s offices. The Guilford County’s Department of Health said in a press release that it will no longer offer first-dose COVID-19 vaccinations at the Coliseum on July 9. […]

The post COVID-19 Vaccination Clinics Coming To A Neighborhood Of Greensboro Near You | Local first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[atom_content] =>
COVID-19 Vaccination Clinics Coming To A Neighborhood Of Greensboro Near You |  Local

GREENSBORO – Local health officials announced they are closing the COVID-19 vaccination clinic at Greensboro Coliseum and focusing on getting the vaccinations right to neighborhoods and some doctor’s offices.

The Guilford County’s Department of Health said in a press release that it will no longer offer first-dose COVID-19 vaccinations at the Coliseum on July 9.

The Guilford County Health Department and Cone Health operate COVID-19 vaccination clinics at Greensboro Coliseum.

Cone Health also said in a news release that mass vaccination sites at Zion Baptist Church in Rockingham County will be closed Thursday and the Burlington Manufacturers’ Outlet Center in Alamance County will close on July 31.

“For the next step in vaccinating our community, we believe it is important to make vaccination even more convenient,” said Debbie Grant, chief nurse officer of Cone Health, in the press release. “This means that we are placing more emphasis on vaccinating people in their neighborhood and at work.”

In its publication, Guilford County said vaccination clinics are held in partnership with churches, schools, recreational facilities, and similar groups. Appointments are possible for people aged 12 and over and can be arranged at www.GuilfordVacciation.com. Viewing appointments are possible, but advance notice is recommended.

The post COVID-19 Vaccination Clinics Coming To A Neighborhood Of Greensboro Near You | Local first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[date_timestamp] => 1624416964 ) [8] => Array ( [title] => Charlotte Brewery is holding a fundraiser for the Alzheimer?s Association [link] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/charlotte-brewery-is-holding-a-fundraiser-for-the-alzheimers-association/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Bill Moran ) [pubdate] => Wed, 23 Jun 2021 01:26:24 +0000 [category] => Charlotte [guid] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8819 [description] =>
Charlotte Brewery is holding a fundraiser for the Alzheimer's Association

First Light Home Care & Edge City Brewery held a fundraiser for the Alzheimer’s Association on June 22nd. CHARLOTTE, NC – A Charlotte brewery was busy this week serving the community with more than just beverages. FirstLight Home Care from Charlotte, Ft. Mill & Rock Hill held a fundraiser at Edge City Brewery on Tuesday […]

The post Charlotte Brewery is holding a fundraiser for the Alzheimer's Association first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[content] => Array ( [encoded] =>
Charlotte Brewery is holding a fundraiser for the Alzheimer's Association

First Light Home Care & Edge City Brewery held a fundraiser for the Alzheimer’s Association on June 22nd.

CHARLOTTE, NC – A Charlotte brewery was busy this week serving the community with more than just beverages.

FirstLight Home Care from Charlotte, Ft. Mill & Rock Hill held a fundraiser at Edge City Brewery on Tuesday June 22nd for the Alzheimer’s Association and to show support for The Longest Day.

According to a message from the agency, “The Longest Day” takes place at the summer solstice. Thousands of people around the world are holding events the week of June 21 in hopes of raising awareness about the disease.

Ken Fleming, owner of FirstLight Home Care, said the company is excited to partner with the Alzheimer’s Association in Queen City.

Rain or shine, we’ll be fine !! Edge City Brewery is the place to go from 4pm to 6pm today. Beer, pizza, music, raffle, …

Posted by FirstLight Home Care of Greater Charlotte on Tuesday Jun 22nd, 2021

“The purpose of this event is to raise awareness that Alzheimer’s is a terrible disease,” he said. ?To be honest, it’s not the disease that everyone has been focusing on for the past year. The Alzheimer’s Association is a wonderful organization that puts so much into fighting this disease and helping people who suffer from it. ”

RELATED: Battle the Darkness of Alzheimer’s on the Longest Day of the Year

The following facts were provided to WCNC about Alzheimer’s disease by FirstLight:

* An estimated 6.2 million Americans will be living with Alzheimer’s disease in 2021 – that number is projected to rise to nearly 13 million by 2050

* Almost two thirds of people with Alzheimer’s disease are women

* In 2020, more than 11 million caregivers for people with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias were providing an estimated 15.3 billion hours of unpaid care, a contribution to the country worth nearly $ 257 billion.

* Between 2000 and 2019, deaths from Alzheimer’s rose 145%

* In 2021, Alzheimer’s disease will cost the US $ 355 billion. That number is set to rise to more than $ 1.1 trillion in 2050.

For more information on Alzheimer’s disease, visit the Alzheimer’s Association at alz.org.

RELATED: Medicare Copays For New Alzheimer’s Drug Could Reach $ 11,500

Download the WCNC Charlotte Mobile App for the latest news, weather and traffic alerts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries

The post Charlotte Brewery is holding a fundraiser for the Alzheimer's Association first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

) [summary] =>
Charlotte Brewery is holding a fundraiser for the Alzheimer's Association

First Light Home Care & Edge City Brewery held a fundraiser for the Alzheimer’s Association on June 22nd. CHARLOTTE, NC – A Charlotte brewery was busy this week serving the community with more than just beverages. FirstLight Home Care from Charlotte, Ft. Mill & Rock Hill held a fundraiser at Edge City Brewery on Tuesday […]

The post Charlotte Brewery is holding a fundraiser for the Alzheimer's Association first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[atom_content] =>
Charlotte Brewery is holding a fundraiser for the Alzheimer's Association

First Light Home Care & Edge City Brewery held a fundraiser for the Alzheimer’s Association on June 22nd.

CHARLOTTE, NC – A Charlotte brewery was busy this week serving the community with more than just beverages.

FirstLight Home Care from Charlotte, Ft. Mill & Rock Hill held a fundraiser at Edge City Brewery on Tuesday June 22nd for the Alzheimer’s Association and to show support for The Longest Day.

According to a message from the agency, “The Longest Day” takes place at the summer solstice. Thousands of people around the world are holding events the week of June 21 in hopes of raising awareness about the disease.

Ken Fleming, owner of FirstLight Home Care, said the company is excited to partner with the Alzheimer’s Association in Queen City.

Rain or shine, we’ll be fine !! Edge City Brewery is the place to go from 4pm to 6pm today. Beer, pizza, music, raffle, …

Posted by FirstLight Home Care of Greater Charlotte on Tuesday Jun 22nd, 2021

“The purpose of this event is to raise awareness that Alzheimer’s is a terrible disease,” he said. ?To be honest, it’s not the disease that everyone has been focusing on for the past year. The Alzheimer’s Association is a wonderful organization that puts so much into fighting this disease and helping people who suffer from it. ”

RELATED: Battle the Darkness of Alzheimer’s on the Longest Day of the Year

The following facts were provided to WCNC about Alzheimer’s disease by FirstLight:

* An estimated 6.2 million Americans will be living with Alzheimer’s disease in 2021 – that number is projected to rise to nearly 13 million by 2050

* Almost two thirds of people with Alzheimer’s disease are women

* In 2020, more than 11 million caregivers for people with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias were providing an estimated 15.3 billion hours of unpaid care, a contribution to the country worth nearly $ 257 billion.

* Between 2000 and 2019, deaths from Alzheimer’s rose 145%

* In 2021, Alzheimer’s disease will cost the US $ 355 billion. That number is set to rise to more than $ 1.1 trillion in 2050.

For more information on Alzheimer’s disease, visit the Alzheimer’s Association at alz.org.

RELATED: Medicare Copays For New Alzheimer’s Drug Could Reach $ 11,500

Download the WCNC Charlotte Mobile App for the latest news, weather and traffic alerts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries

The post Charlotte Brewery is holding a fundraiser for the Alzheimer's Association first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[date_timestamp] => 1624411584 ) [9] => Array ( [title] => Passenger on Greensboro flight was fined for refusing to wear a face mask and threatened to ?board? the flight attendant. [link] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/passenger-on-greensboro-flight-was-fined-for-refusing-to-wear-a-face-mask-and-threatened-to-board-the-flight-attendant/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Bill Moran ) [pubdate] => Tue, 22 Jun 2021 22:52:18 +0000 [category] => Greensboro [guid] => https://nocarolinachronicle.com/?p=8816 [description] =>
Passenger on Greensboro flight was fined for refusing to wear a face mask and threatened to "board" the flight attendant.

Passenger on Greensboro flight fined for refusing to wear a face mask and threatening to “get on” with the flight attendant | myfox8.com Jump to content

The post Passenger on Greensboro flight was fined for refusing to wear a face mask and threatened to "board" the flight attendant. first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[content] => Array ( [encoded] =>
Passenger on Greensboro flight was fined for refusing to wear a face mask and threatened to "board" the flight attendant.

Passenger on Greensboro flight fined for refusing to wear a face mask and threatening to “get on” with the flight attendant | myfox8.com Jump to content

The post Passenger on Greensboro flight was fined for refusing to wear a face mask and threatened to "board" the flight attendant. first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

) [summary] =>
Passenger on Greensboro flight was fined for refusing to wear a face mask and threatened to "board" the flight attendant.

Passenger on Greensboro flight fined for refusing to wear a face mask and threatening to “get on” with the flight attendant | myfox8.com Jump to content

The post Passenger on Greensboro flight was fined for refusing to wear a face mask and threatened to "board" the flight attendant. first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

[atom_content] =>
Passenger on Greensboro flight was fined for refusing to wear a face mask and threatened to "board" the flight attendant.

Passenger on Greensboro flight fined for refusing to wear a face mask and threatening to “get on” with the flight attendant | myfox8.com Jump to content

The post Passenger on Greensboro flight was fined for refusing to wear a face mask and threatened to "board" the flight attendant. first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

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